Art Projects for Seniors with Dementia

Posted on

Aug 10, 2021

To Learn more about About Sunrise of Boulder - Memory Care, CLICK HERE.
Art makes the world better. From the enjoyment that comes from looking at a watercolor painting to creating your own work of art, creativity has a variety of health benefits. Research also shows that engaging in the creative arts improves the lives of adults with dementia.
Here are a few of the many benefits the creative process provides seniors with memory impairment:
Reduced agitation and anxiety: Among the difficult behaviors caused by dementia are anxiety and agitation. When an adult with a memory impairment participates in art projects, they are more likely to remain focused and engaged. It gives them something tangible to do. The end result is often a reduction in anxiety and a boost to mood.
Sense of accomplishment: Short-term memory loss is common among adults with dementia. This can make it more difficult to stay on task and complete activities. Art projects can be empowering because it is the actual process of creating, rather than the finished project, that provides a sense of accomplishment.
Opportunity for self-expression: Dementia impacts different areas of the brain, including those linked to language skills. This can reduce a persons verbal skills as well as their ability to communicate effectively. Because art utilizes a part of the brain that is different from that used for language, it gives people an ability to express themselves. That means a senior who has some form of dementia that affects their speech, can benefit from having a creative outlet as a means for self-expression.
A chance to socialize: Depending on the stage of a seniors dementia, they may be able to participate in art classes. It might be ones you create for them at home or as part of an adult day program or memory care community. This gives the senior an opportunity to socialize with peers that can otherwise be tough to come by.
Easy Art Projects for Adults with Dementia
If you are looking for a few creative art projects for a senior loved one with memory loss, here is a list of ideas to explore:
Paper flowers: These can be as simple or as complex as you choose. Its also an inexpensive project that requires few supplies. DIY Paper Flowers has step-by-step instructions for creating a variety of different floral designs. If you prefer to learn by video, 6 Easy Paper Flowers and How to Make a Flower Out of Paper are several to try.
Adult coloring books: Coloring is another easy art project that is especially great for relaxation. You can purchase these at bookstores and craft stores, along with colored pencils. Simple designs that are larger and easier to see might be best.
Handmade note cards: One easy idea to try is making note cards. You can make watercolor cards, stamp and ink designs, or cards made from pasting photos cut from magazines.
Decorating cookies: Another activity that has both aromatherapy and art therapy benefits is baking and decorating cut-out cookies. You can make seasonally themed cookies, such as for spring or Valentines Day.
Stepping stones: You could also purchase stepping stone kits from the craft store. They come in a variety of themes and designs, and can usually be completed in the course of an afternoon.
It may be a process of trial and error to determine which art projects your senior loved one most enjoys.
Art and Memory Care
At Sunrise communities, we know the important role art can play in the lives of people with dementia. Along with fitness programs and social activities, art is a part of daily life in our memory care Reminiscence Neighborhoods. We invite you to call the Sunrise nearest you to schedule a time for a personal tour!

Other Articles You May Like

What Is the Difference Between Dementia and Alzheimers?

What Is the Difference Between Dementia and Alzheimers?Kim Trevey on Oct 22, 2023 | Bader House of Plano BlogThe words Alzheimers and dementia are often used in the same sentence and even interchangeably, as if theyre the same disease.But this isnt true.In fact, one of these isnt a disease at all.What is dementia?Dementia is not a disease in and of itself but rather a word that describes a group of symptoms related to neurodegeneration, which is a deterioration of cells in the brain. Symptoms of dementia include memory loss; difficulty with reasoning or judgment; changes in thinking skills, language and behavior; and a decrease in the ability to focus.Several conditions can cause dementia, including Alzheimers disease, which would be considered a type of dementia.Other types of dementia include:1. Huntingtons diseaseHuntingtons Disease is a type of dementia is hereditary and usually shows up earlier in life, between the ages of 30 and 50.Along with impairing memory and cognitive function, the first symptom of Huntingtons disease is often uncontrollable movement in the upper body.2. Lewy body dementiaLewy bodies are abnormal deposits of protein in the brain that cause hallucinations, imbalance in the body and attention issues.3. Vascular dementiaVascular Dementia is a type of dementia represents 10% of all dementia cases.It is caused by restricted blood flow in the brain due to blockage in the blood vessels and can lead to stroke or brain bleeds.4. Parkinsons disease dementiaThis type of dementia occurs in those with Parkinsons disease who also experience a decline in thinking and reasoning skills.5. Mixed dementiaWhen the changes in the brain are caused by multiple types of dementia, this is known as mixed dementia.The most common form of mixed dementia is caused by conditions related to Alzheimers disease and vascular dementia.Dementia is more than the natural decline that comes with aging. Dementia signifies damage that has been done to the brain cells to the extent that it is interfering with a persons cognitive function and abilities.What is Alzheimers disease?Named after physician Alois Alzheimer, who was the first to link memory loss symptoms with changes in the brain, Alzheimers disease is the leading disease that causes dementia, causing 60-80% of cases.Alzheimers is a degenerative brain disease that affects cognitive functions such as memory, learning new information, thinking, reasoning, and logic. Symptoms increase and worsen over time.An estimated six million Americans are living with Alzheimers today, most of whom are over the age of 65. About 200,000 Americans under the age of 65 have younger-onset Alzheimers.Is it Alzheimers disease or another form of dementia?Alzheimers disease can be diagnosed through a series of tests conducted by your doctor, whether thats your primary care physician, a neurologist, or a geriatrician. These tests include mental status testing and neuropsychological testing.Mental status testing tests your thinking and memory skills. Your doctor can score how well you do on these tests to determine your level of cognitive impairment.Neuropsychological testing is often conducted by a neuropsychologist. This series of tests will also test your memory and thinking skills but will additionally test if youre able to perform daily functions normally and if another mental condition, such as depression, could be causing your memory loss.Your doctor will also conduct tests to rule out any other factors that could be resulting in Alzheimers-like symptoms, including:brain tumornutritional deficiencyautoimmune diseasemetabolic imbalancereaction to medicationan infectionsubstance abuseYour doctor may also interview family members or people close to you to discuss any changes in your behavior theyve noticed.The bottom line is extensive testing is available that can give you a proper diagnosis of Alzheimers disease or another form of dementia. You can even get tested before you start showing symptoms with the use of MRIs, genetic testing and testing of the liquid around your brain and spinal cord. Your doctor can determine if you are a good candidate for early testing.Understanding the world of neurodegeneration can feel overwhelming, but knowing the difference between Alzheimers disease and dementia can help you determine what symptoms you or a loved one are experiencing and how to approach your doctor.With extensive and ongoing research, specialists have been able to identify the numerous forms of dementia, their causes and possible treatments that wont necessarily cure dementia but can help curb symptoms and improve the quality of life for patients and the loved ones who care for them.

Facts You Need to Know About Dementia

What is Dementia?Dementia is actually not a disease in and of itself but, rather, a syndrome that is characterized by a collection of symptoms affecting cognition and memory, making it hard to remember, think clearly, and make decisions. Alzheimers disease is the most common cause of dementia, although its important to note that not all people who have been diagnosed with dementia necessarily have Alzheimers Disease. Some other types of dementia typically identified are vascular dementia, Lewy body dementia, frontal temporal and mixed dementia.What Are Some Dementia Symptoms?All of us have occasional problems recalling a name, accessing an old memory, or remembering where we may have parked our car. But someone living with dementia will exhibit a range of troubling and persistent symptoms that get worse and may include:         Changes in mood and personality         Decreased or poor judgment         Problems speaking or writing         Confusion with time or place         Disruptions in daily life due to memory loss         Difficulty managing everyday tasks         Repetitive behaviorsIf your loved one is exhibiting any of these symptoms, its important to know that it does not necessarily mean a dementia diagnosis; infections and dehydration, vitamin deficiencies, and depression can present many of these signs. However, if any of these symptoms persist or worsen, its essential that you consult a physician who can make a diagnosis. Its also helpful to know that no single test can make a determination; a diagnosis is based on a range of medical tests, creating a baseline, and an individuals medical history.How Quickly Does the Disease Progress?Dementia is a progressive condition it gets worse over time, not better. For some, the disease progresses rapidly; in others, it takes years to get to the point where outside help is required. The progression depends largely on the underlying cause, whether it be Alzheimers disease, Lewy body disease, Parkinsons disease, or some other root condition. While people will experience the stages of dementia differently, most will exhibit some of the symptoms. On average, dementia patients will live four to eight years after their diagnosis, although some live as long as 20 years after being diagnosed.Does Dementia Only Affect Seniors?Dementia is more commonly diagnosed in people over 65, but it can affect people in their 30s, 40s, or 50s. The estimated average age of onset of dementia in the U.S. is 83+ years old.How Can We Help After A Dementia Diagnosis?If someone has been diagnosed with dementia, its important to know there are expert resources available to both you and your family members that can help you navigate the progression of the disease. The sooner you familiarize yourself with them, the better. As Certified Dementia Practitioners, the advisors at Senior Care Authority can help you decide on the right help at the right time, including setting up in-home visits, scheduling respite care, learning important communication skills, and helping you decide on an assisted living situation, should that be warranted. It is so important to remember that you are not alone. We have helped hundreds of families respond to the challenges of a dementia diagnosis, and we can do the same for you, too. To find out more about the symptoms of dementia and how we can help, get in touch with Senior Care Authority today.

The Essential Role of Socialization for Senior Citizens: Enhancing Well-Being and Quality of Life

As individuals advance in age, maintaining an active social life becomes increasingly vital for their overall well-being. Socialization, often overlooked as a crucial component of health, holds profound benefits, particularly for senior citizens. While physical health receives considerable attention, the significance of social engagement cannot be understated, as it positively impacts mental, emotional, and even physical health outcomes. In this article, we delve into the manifold advantages of socialization for senior citizens and underscore its indispensable role in enhancing their quality of life.1. Mental Stimulation and Cognitive HealthEngaging in social activities stimulates cognitive function, promoting mental acuity and preserving cognitive abilities. Regular conversations, intellectual discussions, and participation in group activities challenge the mind, potentially reducing the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Social interaction encourages seniors to stay mentally active, enhancing memory retention, problem-solving skills, and overall cognitive performance.2. Emotional Well-Being and Mood EnhancementSocialization fosters emotional support networks, offering seniors companionship, empathy, and a sense of belonging. Meaningful connections with peers alleviate feelings of loneliness and isolation, which are prevalent concerns among older adults. Sharing experiences, laughter, and emotional support with friends and acquaintances create a nurturing environment that bolsters emotional resilience and promotes a positive outlook on life. Moreover, social engagement acts as a buffer against stress, anxiety, and depression, contributing to enhanced emotional well-being.3. Physical Health and LongevitySurprisingly, socialization can have tangible effects on physical health and longevity. Active social lifestyles often correlate with healthier habits, including regular exercise, balanced nutrition, and adherence to medical regimens. Additionally, social networks provide avenues for recreational activities such as dancing, walking groups, or sports, promoting physical fitness and mobility. Studies have shown that socially connected seniors tend to have lower rates of chronic diseases, reduced inflammation, and even enhanced immune function, leading to a longer and healthier life.4. Sense of Purpose and Meaningful EngagementMaintaining social connections gives seniors a sense of purpose and involvement in their communities. Volunteer opportunities, participation in clubs or religious organizations, and mentoring younger generations offer avenues for meaningful engagement. Contributing to society and feeling valued for their knowledge and experiences reaffirm seniors' sense of identity and self-worth. These activities imbue life with purpose beyond retirement, fostering a fulfilling and satisfying lifestyle.5. Cognitive Reserve and ResilienceSocialization contributes to the development of cognitive reservethe brain's ability to withstand neurological damage and age-related decline. By continually engaging in social interactions, seniors build cognitive resilience, enabling them to adapt to challenges and maintain mental agility as they age. The diverse cognitive stimuli provided by social engagement help preserve brain structure and function, mitigating the effects of aging and reducing the risk of cognitive impairment.ConclusionIn conclusion, socialization is not merely a recreational pursuit but an indispensable component of healthy aging for senior citizens. Its multifaceted benefits encompass mental stimulation, emotional support, physical well-being, and a sense of purpose, all of which contribute to an enhanced quality of life. Recognizing the significance of social engagement, communities and caregivers must facilitate opportunities for seniors to connect with others and participate in meaningful activities. By prioritizing socialization, we can empower older adults to lead fulfilling, vibrant lives well into their golden years.